The U.S. Congress : From One Crisis to Another

Tribune libre de Vigile
mardi 5 février 2013
860 visites 19 messages

“The full consequences of a default — or even the serious prospect of default — by the United States are impossible to predict and awesome to contemplate. . . Denigration of the full faith and credit of the United States would have substantial effects on the domestic financial markets and on the value of the dollar in exchange markets."
Ronald Reagan (1911-2004), 40th President of the United States (1981–89), (1983)

“Decisions about the debt level [should] occur in conjunction with spending and revenue decisions as opposed to the after-the-fact approach now used, ... [doing so] would help avoid the uncertainty and disruptions that occur during debates on the debt limit today.”
U.S. Government Accountability Office (G.A.O.)

"I will not have another debate with this Congress over whether they should pay the bills for what they’ve racked up. ... We can’t not pay bills that we’ve already incurred."
President Barack Obama, Tuesday January 1, 2013

"That’s why the American people hate Congress."
Chris Christie, New Jersey Republican Governor, (January 2, 2013, after the Republican House majority refused to vote on a $60 billion aid package for victims of Superstorm Sandy)

One crisis averted, three to come ! Indeed, that’s what can be said after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation on January 23, 2013, to suspend the government’s statutory borrowing limit for three months.

In fact, the cycle of artificially created crises will go on and on in Washington D.C. Now, the next crises are scheduled for March 1s, for March 27th and for May 19th. Stay tuned. —On March 1st, automatic sequester cuts agreed by Congress in 2012 will take effect, causing an immediate cut of $69 billion in public discretionary spending. Then, on March 27, the U.S. government’s ability to fund itself (the "continuing resolution") will run out. And, of course, come May 19, the melodrama of raising the debt ceiling will be back again in force.

Ever since Republicans took control of the 435-member U.S. House of Representatives in 2010, a fiscal drama with the White House and the U.S. Senate has been replayed time and again. One of the political gimmick is called the “raising of the country’s debt limit.”

Why so many artificial crises in the current American political system ? Extreme political polarization seems to be the answer.

Indeed, since the 2010 mid-term election, when the Republican Party took control of the House of Representatives with some 242 seats, this party has behaved as if it were in fact two parties in one. There is the traditional conservative Republican Party on one side, and the radical Republican Tea Party on the other side. With some 67 anarchist anti-tax and anti-establishment Tea Party House members voting as a block, the latter has been in a position to hold the balance of power in the House and to prevent compromised solutions to the country’s fiscal problems.

A good example was the 2011 showdown between the Democratic Obama administration and the Republican-controlled House of Representatives regarding raising the U.S. government’s debt ceiling.

In the spring of 2011, House Republicans, spurred by Tea Party members who practice no party discipline toward the Republican Party except to themselves, and reneging on a decades-long bipartisan tradition, refused to raise the nation’s debt ceiling, thus threatening to push the U.S. government toward debt default. They demanded that the Obama administration concede to freezing tax revenues and to enacting massive spending cuts. In the midst of a financial crisis and an economic slowdown, such huge public spending cuts could have pushed the U.S. economy toward an economic depression similar to the 1930’s Great Depression.

For the first time, therefore, House Tea Party members decided to use the perfunctory requirement to raise the debt limit to gain partisan political advantage. That move has introduced into the functioning of the U.S. Congress an element of radicalism and brinkmanship that could prevent the U.S. government from operating properly for years to come.

Mind you, the obligation for Congress to vote on raising the U.S. government’s debt ceiling has existed since a 1917 law to that effect was enacted. It allows the U.S. Treasury to proceed with borrowing to finance government operations as outlined in an already approved budget for a given fiscal year.

Economically speaking, indeed, there are three main ways to finance public expenditures : -through tax revenues ; -through borrowing ; -or, through the printing press, when a government borrows from its own central bank. The latter is in fact an inflation tax imposed on every user of the national currency.
Therefore, if the U.S. Congress has already approved a public budget of operations that does not raise taxes in a sufficient amount to cover outlays, and if an inflation tax is out of question, the only other avenue left is to borrow the required funds.

For years, the 1917 requirement to raise the debt limit was considered redundant since the budget had already been approved and it was seen as a simple bipartisan formality. Since 1940, for example, the U.S. debt ceiling has been raised 94 times, 54 times by a Republican administration and 40 times by a Democratic administration. Altogether the debt ceiling has been raised 102 times since 1917. It has been raised every year that the U.S. government has run a deficit.

If the Tea Party members of the House keep on routinely using the 1917 law to formally raise the debt limit as an obstructionist tool, Congress may be constantly gridlocked and the U.S. government will continue going from crisis to crisis. A small minority of House members could then hold the U.S. government hostage. As a consequence, it could become increasingly difficult for the U.S. Administration to implement sensible economic and fiscal policies along the principle of majority rule. The U.S. economy is bound to suffer severely from such a political paralysis.

In 2011, former president Bill Clinton expressed the view that the 1917 law is unconstitutional since it goes against Article I, sec. 8 of the U.S. Constitution that requires that Congress pay “the Debts and provide for the ... general Welfare of the United States.” Besides, the Fourteenth Amendment (section 4) of the U.S. Constitution states that : "the validity of the public debt of the United States ... shall not be questioned.”

Therefore, if Congress does not fulfill its duties for one reason or another, the President in whom executive power is vested may have the right to act for the “general Welfare of the United States”.

In the coming weeks, if the House of Representatives refuses bipartisan cooperation and keeps stonewalling the Administration, President Obama may have no other choice but to call the Tea Party members’ bluff by unilaterally declaring the 1917 law unconstitutional and letting the courts sort it out later.

A constitutional crisis may seem to many to be a better alternative than a repetitive and protracted economic and financial crisis and an economy constantly teetering on the brink of a permanent “fiscal cliff”.


Dr. Rodrigue Tremblay, a Canadian-born economist, is the author of the book “The Code for Global Ethics, Ten Humanist Principles”, and of “The New American Empire”.

Please visit the book site about ethics at :
www.TheCodeForGlobalEthics.com/

(Aussi, on peut se procurer le livre “Le nouvel empire américain” chez : Amazon France.)

Posted, Thursday, February 7, 2013, at 5:30 am


© 2013 by Big Picture World Syndicate, Inc.

Commentaires

  • Cyberpatriote, 10 février 2013 07h46

    L’article de monsieur Tremblay n’était pas destiné aux lecteurs de Vigile. Il s’agit d’un repiquage pertinent pour comprendre ce qui se passe chez nos voisins et qui peut avoir un impact ici.

    Les gérémiades que je lis ici ne m’impressionnent pas. Plutôt que de vous élever contre cette diffusion, levez-vous debout et mettez sur pied un fonds destiné aux traductions de Vigile. Un fonds dédié si vous le voulez.

    C’est moins facile que de s’indigner le bout des doigts sur un clavier.

  • Jean, 9 février 2013 20h57

    « Ceux qui s’objectent à ce qu’un auteur québécois publie des livres et des articles aux États-Unis et dans le monde entier, et pas seulement au Québec, et en fasse la promotion, sont les mêmes intolérants qui reprochaient à Céline Dion, il y a quelques années, de chanter aux États-Unis. Peut-être vont-ils bientôt s’objecter à ce que des Québécois jouent dans la Ligne nationale de Hockey ! C’est ce que l’on appelle “penser petit”. Ne leur en déplaise, le Québec n’est pas un guetto. »

    Rien de tout ça n’est apparu ici madame Carole. N’y a-t-il pas vous-même un peu d’intolérance dans ce que vous écrivez tout de suite.
    Ce que vous avez vu ailleurs ne s’applique peut-être pas nécessairement ici. Je trouve votre jugement cumulatif et hors frontière. Si je publie ici un texte d’intérêt en Mi’maq, je ne crois pas que ça ferait l’affaire des lecteurs, ghetto ou pas.
    J’ai réagis à quelque chose qui m’est apparu étrange, c’est tout, et ce monsieur Tremblay avec toutes ses oeuvres j’en étais ignorant, et je ne pense pas que monsieur Tremblay s’en formaliserait ; ce n’est pas de ma faute moi, si quelqu’un s’est substitué à ce monsieur pour venir déposer ce texte en anglais ici.
    S’il était venu lui-même probablement qu’il l’aurait publié en français son texte ; en tout cas c’est ce que j’aurais fait moi-même.

    Serge Jean

  • alain maronani, 9 février 2013 17h25

    @Gaston Boivin

    Expliquez-nous un peu l’intérêt que pourrait avoir Rodrigue Tremblay à écrire un texte en francais pour une audience anglophone ?

    D’accord avec Carole, j’aime bien la comparaison avec la LNH ou tout se passe en anglais...

    C’est incroyable que la presque totalité des commentaires s’attachent à la forme plutôt qu’au fond, qui est intéressant...

    Somme toute, en anglais, aucun intérêt, je passe mon tour...

    Le francais est menacé au Québec, a long terme peut-être et surtout si la mondialisation se poursuit, mais il n’est pas plus vulnérable que le finlandais, le suédois, le letton et bien d’autres...même si ce sont des états.

    J’ai aidé une amie, d’origine polonaise, et pas très habile en informatique, a rechercher des radios polonaises diffusées sur Internet....

    Surprise, surprise....la quasi-totalité de ces radios ne diffusent que de la musique anglophone ou des groupes polonais chantant...en anglais !!!

    Mettez ceci en rapport avec les inquiétudes des artistes franco québécois, dont un bon nombre en passant devraient s’extraire du profil boîte à chansons, gratouilleurs de guitare..., et vous constaterez que le malaise est surement plus sérieux que ce que nous tentons d’endiguer...

  • Gaston Boivin, 9 février 2013 15h47

    La Gazette, le National Post, le Globe & Mail etc. ont aussi mission d’informer, pourtant, à ma connaissance, ils ne publient rien en français.

    En ce qui me concerne, je trouverais plus acceptable et honorable que ce soit publié en première page (là où sont normalement les actualités et les articles d’information provenant d’une autre langue) qu’en tribune libre. Par ailleurs, je sais que cet article a été publié en anglais, le 7 février 2013, sur le blogue de monsieur Rodrigue Tremblay à l’adresse suivante : http://www.thenewamericanempire.com/blog.htm Et , à ma connaissance, jusqu’à au moins novembre 2011, ce blog était accessible sur Vigile dans la section des liens d’informations géopolitiques sans que le tout n’ait posé aucun problème. Pourquoi avoir cessé de procéder de cette manière qui n’avait jamais, jusqu’à date, semblé offusquer personne, puisqu’on n’avait jamais vu de plainte à ce propos sur Vigile !?

    Par ailleurs, je trouve pour le moins surprenant et assez extraordinaire qu’on nous serve l’argument que monsieur Tremblay écrit pour un public anglais et qu’on nous reproche ou banalise en même temps notre désir qu’on nous écrive dans notre langue (ne sommes-nous pas nous-mêmes un public à qui il est normal qu’on s’adresse dans sa langue ?) Et je peux encore plus comprendre l’irritation que cela peut provoquer quand l’article en question est écrit par un francophone dont le français est la langue première. Tellement, que même si je lis couramment l’anglais, je ne lis jamais les articles écrits en anglais par monsieur Tremblay, sur son blogue (qui, à l’occasion et plus rarement, publie aussi des articles en français ou parfois une version française d’un texte anglais) pour les américains. Je me garde une petite gêne en tant que non américain de langue anglaise.

    Tant qu’à faire, tant qu’à banaliser (et c’est ce qu’on fait au Québec depuis quelques années en ce qui concerne l’utilisation de la langue française), pourquoi ne pas essayer de faire l’indépendance en utilisant uniquement l’anglais ?! Je peux vous garantir, monsieur Le Hir, que si vous essayez, vous allez échouer car vous allez perdre la grande majorité des francophones qui y sont favorables, parce qu’ils désirent, notamment, l’indépendance pour pouvoir vivre pleinement en français, sans constamment sentir leur langue menacée, dans son existence, par la langue anglaise.

  • Carole, 9 février 2013 14h36

    Note à ceux qui ne veulent pas lire de textes rédigés en anglais.

    Si vous allez sur Google, vous constaterez que le texte en question a été reproduit par environ 9 630 sites Internet à travers le monde en date d’aujoud’hui :
    “The U.S. Congress : From One Crisis to Another”
    Environ 9 630 résultats

    Par conséquent, le site de Virgile n’est qu’un site sur 9 630 à travers le monde à reproduire le texte. Dans certains pays, il est traduit. Dans des pays comme l’Inde et le Pakistan, il ne l’est pas.

    Personne n’est obligé de lire un tel texte. Quant à la liberté de l’auteur de rédiger un texte autrement qu’en français pour le marché américain et international, cela relève de sa pleine liberté.

    Ceux qui s’objectent à ce qu’un auteur québécois publie des livres et des articles aux États-Unis et dans le monde entier, et pas seulement au Québec, et en fasse la promotion, sont les mêmes intolérants qui reprochaient à Céline Dion, il y a quelques années, de chanter aux États-Unis. Peut-être vont-ils bientôt s’objecter à ce que des Québécois jouent dans la Ligne nationale de Hockey ! C’est ce que l’on appelle “penser petit”. Ne leur en déplaise, le Québec n’est pas un guetto.

    De toute évidence, ils ignorent les contributions en français du professeur Tremblay depuis quarante ans. Ce dernier a publié plus de trente livres, et des centaines d’articles, la plupart en français, mais quelques uns en français et en anglais, et certains furent traduits dans d’autres langues, comme la langue turque pour son livre °Le Nouvel empire américain”. Son dernier livre “Le Code pour une éthique globale” est sorti simultanément en français (Liber) et en anglais aux États-Unis (Prometheus Books). —Faites-en autant !

    Carole

  • alain maronani, 9 février 2013 14h34

    @Monsieur Gignac

    Vous pouvez proposer vos services pour traduire en anglais...

    D’accord avec Richard le Hir et Pierre Cloutier.

    Le texte était intéressant car il présentait bien le blocage des institutions américaines, pour qui ne suit pas ceci au jour le jour (influence du Tea Party surtout).

    Les références de traductions automatiques que j’ai référencé, même si elles ne sont pas parfaites, permettent a un locuteur francophone, d’avoir une bonne idée du texte dans l’autre langue, un peu de bonne volonté pour aider Vigile...qui fait déjà l’impossible.

  • 9 février 2013 12h58

    @ Monsieur Le Hir

    Je prends une pause-café et je crois qu’elle sera longue ! Nous les aimons nos colonisateurs à nous mettre à genoux devant eux ! Falardeau avait raison lorsqu’il disait que nous, les Québécois, ne haïssions pas assez nos ennemis. Bonne chance !

    André Gignac 9/2/13

  • Richard Le Hir, 9 février 2013 11h42

    Réponse @ M. Gignac

    Non M. Gignac, ce n’est pas "aussi simple que ça".
    Une bonne traduction de qualité professionnelle coûte de 0,25 à 0,35 $ du mot. C’est donc dire qu’une traduction de 1000 mots coûte de 250 à 350 $. Vigile n’a pas ces moyens-là.

    Alors Vigile va continuer à présenter des textes en anglais lorsque ce sera nécessaire pour éclairer une situation ou souligner un comportement.

    La mission première de Vigile est d’informer, et lorsqu’il sera nécessaire de le faire dans une langue autre que le français, nous le ferons dans la mesure où cela n’aura pas pour effet de compromettre notre combat pour l’indépendance, ce qui n’était pas le cas du texte de Rodrigue Tremblay.

    Richard Le Hir

  • 9 février 2013 11h19

    Monsieur Cloutier

    Vigile n’a qu’à faire traduire le texte en français et nous le présenter sur son site ; c’est aussi simple que ça.

    André Gignac

  • 8 février 2013 22h59

    Rodrigue Tremblay écrit des textes en anglais pour le marché américain. Il pourrait le faire en chinois pour le marché chinois, en russe pour le marché russe, en espagnol pour le marché sud-américain, en japonais pour le marché japonais, en arabe pour le marché arabe et en extra-terreste pour la galaxie. Où est le problème ?

    Je ne pense pas que Rodrigue Tremblay ait écrit cet article pour Vigile. Si cela avait été le cas, il l’aurait écrit en français.

    Je crois que ce sont les gens de Vigile qui ont décidé de publier son article qui a été écrit en angais - je le répète - pour le marché américain.

    Avec les outils de traduction qui existent maintenant sur Internet, on peut prendre connaissance de textes écrits à peu près dans toutes les langues. Où est le problème ?

    Est-ce que Vigile doit empêcher la parution de textes pertinents écrits en anglais ou dans une autre langue ? Le débat est lancé.

    Pierre Cloutier

  • Jean, 8 février 2013 12h50

    Monsieur Pomerleau

    « En tant que souverainiste, il faut penser le Québec en tant qu’État ayant des intérêts à défendre. Il importe donc d’apprécier correctement le contexte et la situation pour y parvenir. Et cela suppose de sortir du cloisonnement provincial pour voir où va le monde ; et ne pas attendre d’être souverain pour se mettre à la tâche. »

    La souveraineté, l’indépendance, c’est comme un peuple, le vôtre ; alors je ne vois pas comment les étrangers vont vous montrer comment faire pour devenir souverain. C’est à vous à faire ça chez-vous, dans votre propre expérience, parce qu’il n’en existe aucune comme la vôtre.

    Monsieur Tremblay ci-haut aura beau virer les Étas-Unis à l’envers, ou même le monde, toujours il sera confronté au fait qu’à la maison ça parle français.

    Un messager qui revient porter un message, dans une langue autre que celle du destinataire eh bien ça ne doit pas être si important que ça ; autrement il se donnerait la peine de traduire.

    Par ailleurs ce monsieur semble silencieux en français, on dirait un fantôme. Peut-être s’est-il fait assimiler à force d’être toujours ailleurs. Il a oublié sa langue natale, ou bien il a peur qu’on ne comprenne pas bien en français, ou encore il ne voulait s’adresser qu’à des gens comme vous monsieur Pomerleau qui êtes visiblement familier avec la langue anglaise.

    Quoi qu’il en soit, ça sent le mépris et le snobisme.
    J’ai quasiment tout fait l’Amérique du Nord, sur le pouce et en moto, et je n’ai jamais trouvé les anglophones méprisants et arrogants .
    Une seule fois dans un train avec un contrôleur anglophone raciste entre Montréal et Hamilton.J’étais jeune je ne comprenais pas ce qui m’arrivait, mais aujourd’hui c’est certain qu’il aurait mon pied dans l’cul.
    Alors ceux qui croient que désirer l’indépendance est une affaire émotive inspirée uniquement par la xénophobie et le mépris gratuit impulsif et simiesque, se fourrent une poutre dans l’oeil ; peut-être que les anglophones qui ont une tête sur les épaules souhaitent secrètement qu’on se lève debout justement pour les inspirer eux-mêmes.

    Jean

  • 7 février 2013 10h10

    @ JC Pomerleau

    "Et cela suppose de sortir du cloisonnement provincial pour voir où va le monde ; et ne pas attendre d’être souverain pour se mettre à la tâche" JC Pomerleau 7/2/13. Je n’ai pas de leçon à recevoir de toi avec ta science fiction sur l’état. Il y a longtemps que j’ai coupé mentalement le cordon ombilical avec le Canada et que je suis devenu internationaliste. Qu’attendent Marois et le PQ avec leur "GOUVERNANCE SOUVERAINISTE" (hic !) pour nous sortir de ce bordel fédéraliste et créer une fois pour toute un pays avec le Québec ? Manque de courage, manque de leadership politique ! Ö OLIGARCHIE ET DÉPENDANCE QUAND TU NOUS TIENS !

    André Gignac 7/2/13

  • JCPomerleau, 7 février 2013 08h34

    M Rodrigue Tremblay (ex ministre de l’industrie dans le gouvernement Lévesque) est un observateur avisé et critique de la politique américaine (une rareté au Québec).Bien que son blogue soit destiné à un publique anglophone, il n’est pas sans intérêt pour ceux qui aspirent à faire du Québec un État souverain de suivre de près ce qui ce passe chez notre voisin du Sud ; d’autant plus que cet acteur étatique est appelé à jouer un rôle clé pour la suite de l’histoire.

    Pourquoi Vigile publie des textes en anglais, parce qu’il est un décodeur des contextes et situations qui peuvent influés sur le projet souverainiste. À ce titre son écran radar doit balayer à l’échelle de la planète (mondialisation) ; continental ; et dans le ROC à partir d’une doctrine politique qui postule que l’État nationale est la garantie de la souveraineté des peuples.

    En tant que souverainiste, il faut penser le Québec en tant qu’État ayant des intérêts à défendre. Il importe donc d’apprécier correctement le contexte et la situation pour y parvenir. Et cela suppose de sortir du cloisonnement provincial pour voir où va le monde ; et ne pas attendre d’être souverain pour se mettre à la tâche.

    JCPomerleau

  • 7 février 2013 08h34

    AU QUÉBEC, C’EST EN FRANÇAIS QUE ÇA SE PASSE !!! AUCUNE CONCESSION DE MA PART !!!

    André Gignac 7/1/13

  • Jean, 7 février 2013 00h31

    Je refuse.

    La plante forcée n’a point de parfum. (Goethe)

    Jean

  • alain maronani, 6 février 2013 19h32

    Le texte a été extrait d’un site destiné aux anglophones...donc aucune raison de l’écrire en francais...

    Pour ceux qui ne peuvent ou ne veulent lire de l’anglais il existe des moyens de traductions automatiques plus ou moins valables...

    http://www.babelfish.com/
    http://softgu.com/google-translate-desktop?mkwid=1C6Dq6XL&pcrid=1859069596&kword=online%20translator&match=b
    http://www.bing.com/translator
    http://translate.google.com/

    Goethe, philosophe et auteur considérable, précurseur du romantisme allemand, disait que l’on ne connait bien sa langue que lorsque l’on est capable d’en maîtriser plusieurs...

  • 6 février 2013 12h32

    EN FRANÇAIS SVP - NOUS SOMMES AU QUÉBEC !!!

    André Gignac 6/2/13

  • Jean, 6 février 2013 12h16

    Monsieur Tremblay

    J’ai bien essayé de comprendre votre texte monsieur Tremblay, mais il y a certains mots dont je ne comprend pas le sens et le traducteur, n’ycomprend rien lui non plus. Voilà, j’ai mis entre guillemets ci-après les quelques mots que je n’arrive pas à décrypter. Vous seriez bien gentil de me les traduire. Merci.

    Serge Jean

    « “The full consequences of a default — or even the serious prospect of default — by the United States are impossible to predict and awesome to contemplate. . . Denigration of the full faith and credit of the United States would have substantial effects on the domestic financial markets and on the value of the dollar in exchange markets." Ronald Reagan (1911-2004), 40th President of the United States (1981–89), (1983)

    “Decisions about the debt level [should] occur in conjunction with spending and revenue decisions as opposed to the after-the-fact approach now used, ... [doing so] would help avoid the uncertainty and disruptions that occur during debates on the debt limit today.” U.S. Government Accountability Office (G.A.O.)

    "I will not have another debate with this Congress over whether they should pay the bills for what they’ve racked up. ... We can’t not pay bills that we’ve already incurred." President Barack Obama, Tuesday January 1, 2013

    "That’s why the American people hate Congress." Chris Christie, New Jersey Republican Governor, (January 2, 2013, after the Republican House majority refused to vote on a $60 billion aid package for victims of Superstorm Sandy)

    One crisis averted, three to come ! Indeed, that’s what can be said after the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation on January 23, 2013, to suspend the government’s statutory borrowing limit for three months.

    In fact, the cycle of artificially created crises will go on and on in Washington D.C. Now, the next crises are scheduled for March 1s, for March 27th and for May 19th. Stay tuned. —On March 1st, automatic sequester cuts agreed by Congress in 2012 will take effect, causing an immediate cut of $69 billion in public discretionary spending. Then, on March 27, the U.S. government’s ability to fund itself (the "continuing resolution") will run out. And, of course, come May 19, the melodrama of raising the debt ceiling will be back again in force.

    Ever since Republicans took control of the 435-member U.S. House of Representatives in 2010, a fiscal drama with the White House and the U.S. Senate has been replayed time and again. One of the political gimmick is called the “raising of the country’s debt limit.”

    Why so many artificial crises in the current American political system ? Extreme political polarization seems to be the answer.

    Indeed, since the 2010 mid-term election, when the Republican Party took control of the House of Representatives with some 242 seats, this party has behaved as if it were in fact two parties in one. There is the traditional conservative Republican Party on one side, and the radical Republican Tea Party on the other side. With some 67 anarchist anti-tax and anti-establishment Tea Party House members voting as a block, the latter has been in a position to hold the balance of power in the House and to prevent compromised solutions to the country’s fiscal problems.

    A good example was the 2011 showdown between the Democratic Obama administration and the Republican-controlled House of Representatives regarding raising the U.S. government’s debt ceiling.

    In the spring of 2011, House Republicans, spurred by Tea Party members who practice no party discipline toward the Republican Party except to themselves, and reneging on a decades-long bipartisan tradition, refused to raise the nation’s debt ceiling, thus threatening to push the U.S. government toward debt default. They demanded that the Obama administration concede to freezing tax revenues and to enacting massive spending cuts. In the midst of a financial crisis and an economic slowdown, such huge public spending cuts could have pushed the U.S. economy toward an economic depression similar to the 1930’s Great Depression.

    For the first time, therefore, House Tea Party members decided to use the perfunctory requirement to raise the debt limit to gain partisan political advantage. That move has introduced into the functioning of the U.S. Congress an element of radicalism and brinkmanship that could prevent the U.S. government from operating properly for years to come.

    Mind you, the obligation for Congress to vote on raising the U.S. government’s debt ceiling has existed since a 1917 law to that effect was enacted. It allows the U.S. Treasury to proceed with borrowing to finance government operations as outlined in an already approved budget for a given fiscal year.

    Economically speaking, indeed, there are three main ways to finance public expenditures : -through tax revenues ; -through borrowing ; -or, through the printing press, when a government borrows from its own central bank. The latter is in fact an inflation tax imposed on every user of the national currency. Therefore, if the U.S. Congress has already approved a public budget of operations that does not raise taxes in a sufficient amount to cover outlays, and if an inflation tax is out of question, the only other avenue left is to borrow the required funds.

    For years, the 1917 requirement to raise the debt limit was considered redundant since the budget had already been approved and it was seen as a simple bipartisan formality. Since 1940, for example, the U.S. debt ceiling has been raised 94 times, 54 times by a Republican administration and 40 times by a Democratic administration. Altogether the debt ceiling has been raised 102 times since 1917. It has been raised every year that the U.S. government has run a deficit.

    If the Tea Party members of the House keep on routinely using the 1917 law to formally raise the debt limit as an obstructionist tool, Congress may be constantly gridlocked and the U.S. government will continue going from crisis to crisis. A small minority of House members could then hold the U.S. government hostage. As a consequence, it could become increasingly difficult for the U.S. Administration to implement sensible economic and fiscal policies along the principle of majority rule. The U.S. economy is bound to suffer severely from such a political paralysis.

    In 2011, former president Bill Clinton expressed the view that the 1917 law is unconstitutional since it goes against Article I, sec. 8 of the U.S. Constitution that requires that Congress pay “the Debts and provide for the ... general Welfare of the United States.” Besides, the Fourteenth Amendment (section 4) of the U.S. Constitution states that : "the validity of the public debt of the United States ... shall not be questioned.”

    Therefore, if Congress does not fulfill its duties for one reason or another, the President in whom executive power is vested may have the right to act for the “general Welfare of the United States”.

    In the coming weeks, if the House of Representatives refuses bipartisan cooperation and keeps stonewalling the Administration, President Obama may have no other choice but to call the Tea Party members’ bluff by unilaterally declaring the 1917 law unconstitutional and letting the courts sort it out later.

    A constitutional crisis may seem to many to be a better alternative than a repetitive and protracted economic and financial crisis and an economy constantly teetering on the brink of a permanent “fiscal cliff”. »

  • Jean, 6 février 2013 11h57

    Monsieur Tremblay, je présume que vous savez écrire dans votre langue le français.

    Jean

Écrire un commentaire

modération a priori

Ce forum est modéré a priori : votre contribution n’apparaîtra qu’après avoir été validée par un administrateur du site.

Qui êtes-vous ?
Votre message
  • Pour créer des paragraphes, laissez simplement des lignes vides.

Ajouter un document
Ajouter un document

Éviter les réponses à un autre commentaire, les commentaires s’appliquent au texte seulement.

Pas d'attaques personnelles ni de propos injurieux ou discriminatoires.

Vigile se réserve le droit de refuser tout commentaire sans avoir à justifier sa décision éditoriale.

Veuillez lire attentivement les consignes détaillées avant de soumettre votre premier commentaire.

Consignes détaillées

Tribune libre de Vigile

Financement de Vigile

N’hésitez pas à contribuer à sa production

Joignez-vous aux Amis de Vigile

Objectif 2014: 60 000$
25 128$  42%
Paiement en ligne
Don récurrent

Contributions récentes :

  • 23/11 Linda Rivard: 10$
  • 23/11 Normand Lefebvre: 25$
  • 23/11 Serge Lapointe : 30$
  • 23/11 Erik Vasseur : 20$
  • 23/11 Alexandra Villeneuve: 10$
  • 23/11 Alexandra Villeneuve: 10$
  • 23/11 J.-Jacques Delisle: 100$
  • 23/11 Jean-Claude Archetto: 50$

Toutes les contributions

Merci beaucoup!